Khan el Khalili

Address: , El Cairo, Kairo, Egypt

Latitude: 30.0640420

Longitude: 31.2492370

Time Zone: Central Africa Time

Categories: Shopping, Attraction, Activities

Tags: Cultural, Outdoors, Family

Reviews

Khan el-Khalili, one of the oldest markets in the Middle, a little older than 600 years, and still authentic architecture persists unchanged since the Mamluk era until now. Immigrated to him a large number of traders Palestinian city of Hebron and Sknoh and now has the community of folks Hebron inhabit it operates trade and them attributed Khan el-Khalili in Cairo has been named by that name proportion to its founder is one of the princes Mamluks and was named Yarkas Khalili, one of the city of Hebron.

If we go back by time back lot will Italana Arab historian months ( Maqrizi ) who says that Khan building big box surrounded courtyard and resembles the Agency, including class bottom of it stores, and comprises the upper layers stores and housing, has been named this name relative to the origin Sharif (Khalili), which It was great merchants in the era of Sultan plum in 1400.

If the popular proverb says: "The guy runs the place Healing brush", the first his bear on the ground Khan must be in a cafe Fishawi, who over the age of two hundred years, one of the oldest cafes in Cairo, and was the great writer Naguib Mahfouz of months astronauts in period the sixties of the twentieth century
yeah its wonderful touristy place to visit, specially if you looking for Souvenirs, but be sure to have a local friend to help you there so they don't rip you off, they give touristy prices if you don't know how much it worth,
Enjoy your time there ,
Khan El Khalili (Cairo old market)
The Khan El-Khalili is one of the most interesting bazaars, not only in Egypt, but also in the whole Middle East.
Cafes, restaurants, shops, and large number of vendors and buyers constitute a dynamic panorama of the place. Drinking Hibiscus, Karakare, Helba, or any of the various typical Egyptian beverages, is a pleasant experience for visitors and guests to get a real taste experience. For smokers, there is the Shisha, or water pipe, to be tried.
Every visitor can take the opportunity to safely enjoy the walk through the narrow streets of Khan El-Khalili.
its wonderful market all over the world and the oldest market all over the world its Islamic style market its located between the famous mosques and oldest mosques in Cairo its like narrow street on each side this street the different shops copper gold and silver but when buy do not forget the bargain with salesmen .
Located in close proximity to Islamic Cairo, Khan El Khalili is one of the largest bazaars in the region. Originally founded in the 14th century, the bazaar is home to Egypt’s oldest crafts and crafts workshops. Jam-packed with shops and vendors selling anything and everything from gold and silver jewelry, leather goods, perfume, papyrus and ancient Egyptian trinkets, this is the perfect venue to buy souvenirs and unique items, or to practice your bargaining skills – a must-do at the bazaar!
The Khan El-Khalili is one of the most interesting bazaars, not only in Egypt, but also in the whole Middle East.

It was named after Prince Jaharkas Al-Khalili, who was one of the powerful Mamluke Princes in the 14th century. It is famous for its unusual, typically oriental souvenirs, and handmade crafts. The Medieval atmospheres of this traditional market, together with the labyrinth layout of the streets, gives visitors o lot of pleasure and a glimpse into what medieval markets once were like.

Cafes, restaurants, shops, and large number of vendors and buyers constitute a dynamic panorama of the place. Drinking Hibiscus, Karakare, Helba, or any of the various typical Egyptian beverages, is a pleasant experience for visitors and guests to get a real taste experience. For smokers, there is the Shisha, or water pipe, to be tried.

Every visitor can take the opportunity to safely enjoy the walk through the narrow streets of Khan El-Khalili. We strongly recommend visiting this vivid bazaar, but keep in mind that in open traditional markets, the prices are not fixed; remember to bargain (haggle) to get the best price. The Khan El-Khalili Bazaar is place where art and commerce come together to give a unique and remarkable, harmonious experience.
..................................................................................................................................................................................................................one of the the biggest Bazaars in the World ...............................................................................................................................................................
How could a market in Egypt be responsible for the founding of the United States? Khan el-Khalili, once known as the Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman period, is now usually just called the 'Khan', and the names of it and the Muski market are often used interchangeably to mean either. Named for the great Caravansary, the market was built in 1382 by the Emir Djaharks el-Khalili in the heart of the Fatimid City. Together with the al-Muski market to the west, they comprise one of Cairo's most important shopping areas.
I adore khan el kalili.. you can get anything you want its a very old bazarre. If you want real gold its a great place to go. i have had gold necklaces fixed for just a few pounds while i wait. for shisha and egyptian drinks there are so many cafes. I prefer the ones hidden within the stall and kiosks and upstairs to see the ppl and shops while enjoying a rest from shopping. its one of my vry favorite places to go nd browse and buy things and can bargain on prices and all the things they have are for fun and to save and keep for memories if egypt. the cafes for food are average. the reason to go is for the shisha and the shopping also the egyptian culture.
This market is situated at one corner of a triangle of markets that go south to Bab Zuwayla and west to Azbakiyyah. The Khan is bordered on the south by al-Azhar Street and on the west by the Muski Market. One of the old original gates guards the entrance to the original courtyard which lies midway down Sikkit al-Badistan (street). On a narrow street leading off al-Badistand, one will find the El-Fishawi Cafe, or Cafe of Mirrors, which was once a meeting place for local artists, and is still frequented by the Nobel Award winning Naguib Mahfouz, one of Egypt's most well known authors. There are any number of canvas covered streets such as the one pictured to the right.



Egyptian buyers generally shop in the area north of al-Badistan and to the west, where prices may be lower. Better deals for gold and silver are to be found west of the Khan along the "street of the goldsellers", and further on one will find the Brass and Coppersmith Markets.

History
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established.[1] It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.

[edit] Today
In addition to shops, there are several coffeehouses (مقهى maqha or قهوة qahwah, depending on dialect), restaurants, and street food vendors distributed throughout the market. The coffeeshops are generally small and quite traditional, serving Arabic coffee and usually offering shisha. The al-Hussein Mosque is also in Khan el-Khalili; Al-Azhar University and its mosque are not far away.

Naguib Mahfouz's novel Midaq Alley (1947) is set in an alley in Khan el-Khalili
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established. It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.
Khan el-Khalili (Arabic: خان الخليلي‎) is a major souk in the Islamic district of Cairo. The bazaar district is one of Cairo's main attractions for tourists and Egyptians alike.
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established. It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established.[1] It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.

Today
In addition to shops, there are several coffeehouses (مقهى maqha or قهوة qahwah, depending on dialect), restaurants, and street food vendors distributed throughout the market. The coffeeshops are generally small and quite traditional, serving Arabic coffee and usually offering shisha. The al-Hussein Mosque is also in Khan el-Khalili; Al-Azhar University and its mosque are not far away.

Naguib Mahfouz's novel Midaq Alley (1947) is set in an alley in Khan el-Khalili.
Though its so active specially at night, its my favorite place to rest my mind and enjoy the Egyptian culture. Walking in the streets of this wonderful place makes you feel like you have been through the time machine to Islamic Egypt. You can smell the wonderful aroma of herbs and arabic incense everywhere.
Its also a perfect place for shopping with thousands stores. You can simply find many traditional stuff there, clothes, souvenirs, accessories, Pharaonic statues, even traditional and oriental food, and so much more. You can also enjoy a cup of egyptian coffee or a Shisha on one of the most famous Egyptian traditional café (El Fishawy).
The place is a bit crowded sometimes but its wonderful enough to visit. Whoever visited Egypt without visiting Khan El Khalili and Al Azhar surrounding area have missed too many things to see!
Khan el-Khalili

Not a monument – but a great way to spend an enjoyable evening browsing or buying from the hundreds of shops and stalls which sell everything imaginable. The original building of this famous bazaar was constructed in 1382 by Amir Garkas el-Khalili and later became a caravanserai (hostelry) in downtown Cairo’s area of affluence and commerce, for travelling merchants from all over the world. Today the Khan el-Khalili is a labyrinth of narrow streets and passageways, sometimes covered over, where many craftsmen work in gold, silver, brass, leather, glassware and stones. There are shops which will make a shirt or galabeya while you wait, shops selling perfume and incense and many many coffee shops where you can watch the world go by. If you are looking for souvenirs there is plenty of variety and the fierce competition makes it worth practising your bargaining skills. Khan el-Khalili is said to be one of the biggest bazaars in the world.

The Khan el-Khalili is situated a little north of the Citadel and seems to be open from early morning until the last tourist goes home at night. Some shops however, may be closed on Friday or Sunday for religious purposes.
it is even the most oriental area to see trading and shopping for all goods and yu are not afraid to get lost from material to gold silver parfums goods in kitchen food, underwear, insense well toys hair decor anything it is small busy everyone can trade and yu can walk in peace well it is marvoulous for the eyes , the smells even fooding is possible, yu can drink even tea and it is histrical to even an old sesame moulin in this area very old area until even the azhar mosque of the teaching of islam and even famous people grow up there like naguib mahfouz and sheikh schrawy well let yrself drift yu will find never lost, in ramdan even peaceful take around the histrical area will also have rest in yur mind it is all in one this is real oriental flair enjoy it
Khan El-Khalili is a wonderful place to see in the downtown of Cairo. It is not only crowded with the shops of souviners and peoplefrom different nationalities but also the old mosques and islamic buildings. Also, there are many coffee shops and Egyptian restaurants throughout the place.
Shopping at its best. Shop for papyrus papers, souvenirs, symbolic statues, shisha, shirts and scarfes and lots of cultural stuff all in one place with good prices if you negotiate the sellers. Also oriental cafes all around the place. You can't miss this place if you go to Cairo
it's the biggest Cairo open-air bazaar that filled with alot of shops, belly dancing costumes stores and silver jewelry stores.In addition to shops, there are a lot of coffeehouses "qahwah" where you can hang out with friends and smoke some she'shea "Hooka".The coffeehouses are generally small and traditional, serving Arabic coffee "Ahwa Turky"."Qahwet el Fishawy" is the most famous coffeehouse.
you can feel there with the cozy place of the real old Cairo.
The Khan El-Khalili is one of the most interesting bazaars, not only in Egypt, but also in the whole Middle East.

It was named after Prince Jaharkas Al-Khalili, who was one of the powerful Mamluke Princes in the 14th century. It is famous for its unusual, typically oriental souvenirs, and handmade crafts. The Medieval atmospheres of this traditional market, together with the labyrinth layout of the streets, gives visitors o lot of pleasure and a glimpse into what medieval markets once were like.

Cafes, restaurants, shops, and large number of vendors and buyers constitute a dynamic panorama of the place. Drinking Hibiscus, Karakare, Helba, or any of the various typical Egyptian beverages, is a pleasant experience for visitors and guests to get a real taste experience. For smokers, there is the Shisha, or water pipe, to be tried.

Every visitor can take the opportunity to safely enjoy the walk through the narrow streets of Khan El-Khalili. We strongly recommend visiting this vivid bazaar, but keep in mind that in open traditional markets, the prices are not fixed; remember to bargain (haggle) to get the best price. The Khan El-Khalili Bazaar is place where art and commerce come together to give a unique and remarkable, harmonious experience
Khan el Khalili is one of the largest bazaars in the Middle East, if not the world. The bazaar began as a caravanserai built in 1382 by Garkas el Khalili, Sultan Barquq's Master of Horses. When the Ottomans gained control of Egypt, the caravanserai changed from a fairly simple inn where caravans rested and a little trade was carried out to a fully fledged Turkish bazaar which attracted traders and customers from throughout the world.
this place is fantastic.it makes me feel happy although it`s not that charming.there i know some restaurants which are like WOW.you can buy souvenires from there.You can listen to some of the egyptian talents in el oood.You can sit on el fishaweya cafè
Its a kind of an old interesting place which have very old culture where u can see old art of Islamic history same like other places in this area (Citadel), there you can try our tradition tea or sometimes try to taste the real tradition food of Egyptian culture. Also the one of the famous mosques in Egypt (Alhussein Mosque) give the place an tromends value of such a great art building it is till this moment.
Its a great cultural traditional place where you can go and enjoying a nice oriental day. Buying souvenirs from jewelry to furniture to clothes. And you can enjoy the small alley ways and smoke your pipe there amongst the bustling crowds of the market. Its the heart n center of Egyptian culture and a must see location for all visitors. And it is safe for many tourists frequent this market on a daily basis and the security there is tight! But you must never accept the prices they give you when purchasing things you must bargain till you drop!!!!!
I think most of you think that Egypt have only a Pharaohs places to visit , that's a very wrong , egypt have pass with defreent ages of civilization , Pharaohs, Romanian , Greek , christian , Islamic , and the modern age ,


khan el kalili is one of the most old places in old Cairo in it you will find a good place to see a lot of old houses and its a nice place to buy some sevoniers , and don't forget to have some shisha or Egyptian tee on any cafe there :D
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established.[1] It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.
In addition to shops, there are several coffeehouses, restaurants, and street food vendors distributed throughout the market. The coffeeshops are generally small and quite traditional, serving Arabic coffee and usually offering shisha. The al-Hussein Mosque is also in Khan el-Khalili; Al-Azhar University and its mosque are not far away, Another famous place to hang out in Khan el Khalili is "Qahwet el Fishawy" this place is incredible for everyone, they serve one of the best shisha in Egypt.
Very unique with the total ambiance of the old Fatimid mosques, and the ancient Mashrabeyas , the oriental coffee shops ( Qahwa ) like al fishawy , as well as the oriental egyptian restaurants , shops that sell the souvenirs , the walking merchants , the beautifull tyoical artistic area
Khan el-Khalili is a major souk in the Islamic district of Cairo. The bazaar district is one of Cairo's main attractions for tourists and Egyptians alike.
The souk dates back to 1382, when Emir Djaharks el-Khalili built a large caravanserai (خان khan in Arabic) in Cairo under the Burji Mamluk Sultan Barquq; the eponymous khan is still extant. By the time of Barquq, the first Circassian Mamluk Sultan (1382- 1399 A.D.) much reconstruction needed to be done within the walls of the city in order to repair the damage incurred as a result of the Black Death. When Barquq started his madrassa in Bayn el-Qasrayn, markets were rebuilt, and Khan el-Khalili was established.[1] It was also known Turkish bazaar during the Ottoman Empire.
In addition to shops, there are several coffeehouses (مقهى maqha or قهوة qahwah, depending on dialect), restaurants, and street food vendors distributed throughout the market. The coffeeshops are generally small and quite traditional, serving Arabic coffee and usually offering shisha. The al-Hussein Mosque is also in Khan el-Khalili; Al-Azhar University and its mosque are not far away, Another famous place to hang out in Khan el Khalili is "Qahwet el Fishawy" this place is incredible for everyone, they serve one of the best shisha in Egypt.
Naguib Mahfouz's novel Midaq Alley (1947) is set in an alley in Khan el-Khalili.
its a place you can find all your needs gifts clothes all what you need and have restaurants to rest as well, and you can spend all the day there
Khan il Khalili is one of the largest and oldest bazaars (or souqs) in the Middle East. Today you will find it has plenty of tourists and other holiday-makers, as well as some pushy salesmen. Shops sell all sorts of everyday and souvenir items and there are some areas devoted to particular products, such as gold. You'll also find cafes along the way where you might like to sit and take a rest while you watch the hustle and bustle around you. Mind you, you might still be approached by wandering salesmen working the tables. Most tour companies offer a visit to the Khan as part of a day tour. If you want to go alone any taxi will know exactly where to take you.

More Information

Find more places to visit in Cairo

Get travel answers from locals in Cairo