Question

DO i need special vacinations to come to ghana as a tourist, what are the most likely health hazards?

Location

Country: Ghana

Answers

First and foremost the ever popular Yellow Fever shits valid for 10 years.
Secondarily do get your antimalarial at least 2 weeks prior to your flight to any tropical malaria prone areas
it is important when visiting Ghana to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)
To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it.
Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.
Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.
Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.
Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.
Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Vaccine recommendations are based on the best available risk information. Please note that the level of risk for vaccine-preventable diseases can change at any time.
Vaccination or Disease Recommendations or Requirements for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Routine

Recommended if you are not up-to-date with routine shots such as, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc.
Yellow Fever Yellow fever vaccination requirement for travelers to Ghana: Required upon arrival from all countries CDC recommendation: For all travelers >9 months of age Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10 year intervals if there is on-going risk. Find an authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccination clinic.
Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG)
Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in countries with an intermediate or high level of hepatitis A virus infection (see map) where exposure might occur through food or water. Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors.
Hepatitis B
Recommended for all unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries with intermediate to high levels of endemic HBV transmission (see map), especially those who might be exposed to blood or body fluids, have sexual contact with the local population, or be exposed through medical treatment (e.g., for an accident).
Typhoid Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in West Africa, especially if visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas and staying with friends or relatives where exposure might occur through food or water.
Meningococcal (meningitis) Recommended if you plan to visit countries that experience epidemics of meningococcal disease during December through June (see map).
Rabies Recommended for travelers spending a lot of time outdoors, especially in rural areas, involved in activities such as bicycling, camping, or hiking. Also recommended for travelers with significant occupational risks (such as veterinarians), for long-term travelers and expatriates living in areas with a significant risk of exposure, and for travelers involved in any activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats, carnivores, and other mammals. Children are considered at higher risk because they tend to play with animals, may receive more severe bites, or may not report bites. Note: Rabies vaccine is temporarily in limited supply. For updates on the rabies vaccine supply, please check the Rabies News and Highlights page regularly.
Polio

Recommended for adult travelers who have received a primary series with either inactivated polio virus vaccine (IPV) or oral polio vaccine (OPV). They should receive another dose of IPV before departure. For adults, available data do not indicate the need for more than a single lifetime booster dose with IPV.
yellow fever vaccination is no "shit" if u know what i mean. stop using thos words.
Preparing for Your Trip to Ghana
Before visiting Ghana, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)
To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it.
Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.
Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.
Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.
Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.
Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Vaccine recommendations are based on the best available risk information. Please note that the level of risk for vaccine-preventable diseases can change at any time.
Vaccination or Disease Recommendations or Requirements for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Routine

Recommended if you are not up-to-date with routine shots such as, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc.
Yellow Fever Yellow fever vaccination requirement for travelers to Ghana: Required upon arrival from all countries CDC recommendation: For all travelers >9 months of age Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10 year intervals if there is on-going risk. Find an authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccination clinic.
Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG)
Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in countries with an intermediate or high level of hepatitis A virus infection (see map) where exposure might occur through food or water. Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors.
Hepatitis B
Recommended for all unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries with intermediate to high levels of endemic HBV transmission (see map), especially those who might be exposed to blood or body fluids, have sexual contact with the local population, or be exposed through medical treatment (e.g., for an accident).
Typhoid Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in West Africa, especially if visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas and staying with friends or relatives where exposure might occur through food or water.
Meningococcal (meningitis) Recommended if you plan to visit countries that experience epidemics of meningococcal disease during December through June (see map).
Rabies Recommended for travelers spending a lot of time outdoors, especially in rural areas, involved in activities such as bicycling, camping, or hiking. Also recommended for travelers with significant occupational risks (such as veterinarians), for long-term travelers and expatriates living in areas with a significant risk of exposure, and for travelers involved in any activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats, carnivores, and other mammals. Children are considered at higher risk because they tend to play with animals, may receive more severe bites, or may not report bites. Note: Rabies vaccine is temporarily in limited supply. For updates on the rabies vaccine supply, please check the Rabies News and Highlights page regularly.
Polio

Recommended for adult travelers who have received a primary series with either inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) or oral polio vaccine (OPV). They should receive another dose of IPV before departure. For adults, available data do not indicate the need for more than a single lifetime booster dose with IPV.
u will need yellow fever vaccination. Malaria is one of the commonest illnes that affects foriegners who come to Ghana. You will need to protect yourself with medicated mosquito nets.

The hospitality here is amazing.
Dear Raji,
The most important vaccination you need will be yellow fever. It will be required of you to present a yellow fever card at DGAA/ACC APT.(Accra-Kotoka Airport, which is the main airport of entry ) you can add anti-malarial but generally not a requirement it is for your own benefit anyway. I know this cos I work as a flight Operations manager and usually deal with these sort of clarifications.

B/regards.
Dear Raji,
The most important vaccination you need will be yellow fever. It will be required of you to present a yellow fever card at DGAA/ACC APT.(Accra-Kotoka Airport, which is the main airport of entry ) you can add anti-malarial but generally not a requirement it is for your own benefit anyway. I know this cos I work as a flight Operations manager and usually deal with these sort of clarifications.

B/regards.
yes u need to do exactly that. b'cos we are developing economy we still have problems with our environment and so therefore i will advice to be more careful with diseases like yellow fever, tb, malaria.
U don't necesserily need vacination before coming to Ghana. Right now, most of the Commmunities here in Ghana is safe to visit. It so depends on the kind of environment you want to be. Most of the environments are clean and neat to stay. So my brother, you don't need any special vacination. The only problem I can talk of is mosquito but there are a lot of mosquito repelantes in the market to keep them away from you. I hope I've answered your question to your satisfaction.
You will need to take special vaccinations two weeks before your trip against health hazard like Malaria, Yellow Fever, TB.
ghana is a tropical country therefore diseases like malaria,yellow fever are found and as a foriegner who does not have resistance to some of these deseases must at least get vaccinated against basically maralia and yellow fever. but after taken these vccinations you bacically have no much problem healthwise. i hope you will enjoy ghana
Yes Mr RAJ,
visiting a country like GHANA needs the HEALTH CERTIFICATE OR REQUIREMENTS which will protect you in both the country or the visited destination.

in this country the MINISTRY OF HEALTH incollaboration with the WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION has come out with a release of a specific infection which are especially more ENDEMIC. Such is YELLOW FEVER, MALARIA,CHOLERA,PLAQUE and SMALL POX.

Hence you must take the vaccination which will serve as an antidose in reaching your destination and all these will be proved by INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATE OF VACCINATION OR YELLOW CARD, which is mandatory as one of the entry requirement at our port.

This is checked by the PORT HEALTH OFFICIALS, in that case the Validity of the vaccination last for 10years but it takes 10days before its starts to work within u. if your period of issue the vaccination certificate was not due Before reaching a destination, the port officials can deport you back to your country or QUARANTINE (detain) you till your vaccination time is due which qualifies u to stay and get into contact.

Malaria is another disesase you must take precaution against so far as ghana mosquitoes are concer, with this the tablets or the repelant is needed on u always to prevent it,

For CHOLERA especially visiting ghana during the rain season around june to probably August, the vaccination period also last for a year, but not for pregnant women at a certain times in protecting the child.

Visiting the northern section of the country, one must take precaution against an blood flow through the nose during the hot or warm season in the norht around march or the dry harmattan season somewhere late december to january. such is called (CSM) CEREBRO (the tube from neck to brain) SPINAL MENINGITIS.
The most important vaccinations you will need are yellow fever and malaria shots. It will be required of you to present a yellow fever card at DGAA/ACC APT at Kotoka Airport,Accra which is the main airport of Ghana I know this cause i have worked with quite a number of tourist who went through this process and it really helped them with their health..
check from your travel agent in your country to advise
As has been stated, Yellow Fever is a must. In fact some countries even refuse you entry without a yellow fever vaccination. (It lasts for ten years not shits 10 years, that would be terrible lol)
Buy anti-malarial drugs, and insect repellent creams etc.

Health Hazards
Be careful where you buy your food and what food you are buying. Make sure it is in a clean environment. If you want to eat the local food go to a reputable guest house or hotel, or better yet if you're staying with a host family ask them to prepare some for you. You don't want worms or worse!
Hope this helps.
Besides this, Ghana is a great place to visit and the people are really friendly. The food is good, and generally the rule is be sensible about what you eat and where you eat it.

Akwaaba!
If you can vaccinate yourself against yellow fever and especially malaria you will be fine.
well,whenever you wanna come to Ghana,all you need to do is to go to your vaccination center and have a vaccination,that is being made up of malaria fever,yellow fever etc,so as to ensure that you are safety from some common diseases,that is the most important thing you have to do before coming to Ghana
TO come to Ghana you need a yellow fever vaccine, a malaria pill treatment, a TB vaccine recently added and guide yourself against typhoid. Use a condom too man, always protect yourself
it is important to have a vacination to come to ghana if you have never been to ghana,visit the ghana embassy site for the latest updates on vacinations for tourist who would like to visit.good luck and hoping to see you soon
Dear Rajji,

Before visiting Ghana, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)
To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it.
Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.
Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.
Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.
Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.
Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Vaccine recommendations are based on the best available risk information. Please note that the level of risk for vaccine-preventable diseases can change at any time.
Vaccination or Disease Recommendations or Requirements for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
Routine

Recommended if you are not up-to-date with routine shots such as, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc.
Yellow Fever Yellow fever vaccination requirement for travelers to Ghana: Required upon arrival from all countries CDC recommendation: For all travelers >9 months of age Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10 year intervals if there is on-going risk. Find an authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccination clinic.
Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG)
Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in countries with an intermediate or high level of hepatitis A virus infection (see map) where exposure might occur through food or water. Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors.
Hepatitis B
Recommended for all unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries with intermediate to high levels of endemic HBV transmission (see map), especially those who might be exposed to blood or body fluids, have sexual contact with the local population, or be exposed through medical treatment (e.g., for an accident).
Typhoid Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in West Africa, especially if visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas and staying with friends or relatives where exposure might occur through food or water.
Meningococcal (meningitis) Recommended if you plan to visit countries that experience epidemics of meningococcal disease during December through June (see map).
Rabies Recommended for travelers spending a lot of time outdoors, especially in rural areas, involved in activities such as bicycling, camping, or hiking. Also recommended for travelers with significant occupational risks (such as veterinarians), for long-term travelers and expatriates living in areas with a significant risk of exposure, and for travelers involved in any activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats, carnivores, and other mammals. Children are considered at higher risk because they tend to play with animals, may receive more severe bites, or may not report bites. Note: Rabies vaccine is temporarily in limited supply. For updates on the rabies vaccine supply, please check the Rabies News and Highlights page regularly.
Polio

Recommended for adult travelers who have received a primary series with either inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) or oral polio vaccine (OPV). They should receive another dose of IPV before departure. For adults, available data do not indicate the need for more than a single lifetime booster dose with IPV.
Don't forget to take hepatites A,B, and C and cerebrospinal meningitis vaccines. Think also about malaria, cholera,typhoid. Stay put
yes you need a vaccination to come to ghana
It is necessary to have vaccination but not as a prerequisite before you can come to Ghana.Although you will face problems but there are ways to get out of it.That is to say there are other ways to get yourself protected against all these diseases and we have many here in Ghana.
NOT REALLY COS GHANA IS NOT ALL THAT DIRTY AS COMPARED TO SOME OTHER COUNTRIES IN AFRICA. MALARIA CAN BE ONE HEALTH HAZARD BUT YOU CAN PREVENT IT PROMPTLY
You don't need any 'special ' vaccines when coming to Ghana but you have to protect yourself to enjoy your stay in Ghana.You can take Vaccines Against Malaria since Malaria is very common in Ghana and Yellow Fever vaccines.
Health Information
VACCINES and MALARIA

* Yellow fever: Ghana requires yellow fever vaccination for all travelers.
o International health authorities consider Ghana to be a yellow fever "infected" country because human cases of the disease have been reported in these regions: Upper East, Upper West. Authorities also consider it "endemic" because the potential for disease transmission exists in areas that may not currently report human cases.
* Other vaccines: Depending on your itinerary, your personal risk factors, and the length of your visit, your health care provider may offer you vaccination against hepatitis A, typhoid, hepatitis B, rabies, meningococcal meningitis, influenza, or a one-time polio booster if you haven't previously received one for travel. Cholera vaccine is not indicated for travelers except for the special circumstance of aid and refugee workers. Routine immunizations, such as those that prevent tetanus/diphtheria or "childhood" diseases, should be reviewed and updated as needed.
* Malaria: Risk (predominantly P. falciparum) exists throughout the year in the whole country. Medicines that protect against malaria in this area include mefloquine (Lariam), doxycycline , or atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone). The best drug for you depends on your itinerary and on a number of personal factors that should be discussed between you and your health care provider. Antimalarial drugs may not be available in this country, and travelers staying longer than 1 month should consider carrying a treatment dose of atovaquone/proguanil or quinine in case their protective medicines fail.
o Because no malaria drug is 100% effective, if you have traveled in an area of malaria risk, seek immediate medical attention for any fever or flu-like illness occurring within 3 months of your return home. Be sure to tell your health care provider your travel history.

OTHER HEALTH ISSUES

* Insect-borne diseases: Mosquitoes and flies transmit a variety of diseases in this country, including dengue fever, yellow fever, malaria, African trypanosomiasis, and onchocerciasis. Personal protective measures are extremely important since insects cannot be avoided.
* Food- and water-borne diseases: Quite a few diseases, including hepatitis A and typhoid fever, are transmitted by unsanitary food handling procedures and contaminated water. Food and beverage precautions are essential in order to reduce chance of illness. Anti-diarrheal drugs may be prescribed by your provider. Tuberculosis is common in all developing countries. However, this country has a prevalence of over 100 cases per 100,000 population, the highest WHO risk category. Travelers planning to stay more than 3 months should have pre-departure PPD skin test status documented. Travelers should avoid crowded public places and public transportation whenever possible. Domestic help should be screened for TB.
* Schistosomiasis is present and is transmitted in freshwater lakes and rivers by larvae which penetrate intact skin.
* Sporadic, rare Lassa fever activity occurs. Transmission is via contact with infected rodents.
First and foremost the ever popular Yellow Fever shits valid for 10 years.
Secondarily do get your antimalarial at least 2 weeks prior to your flight to any tropical malaria prone areas
Yes, you need to get your yellow fever shots which is quite imperative. Malaria is another health issue in Ghana,so get your anti-malaria drugs before coming. You should start the dose before setting off on your trip to Ghana.

Hope to hear from you soon.


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MOSTLY YELLOW FEVER VACINNES, ARE THE ONLY NECESSARY ONES, BUT U MIGHT NEED TO PROTECT YOURSELF AGAIN MOSQUITO BITES ESPECIALLY AT NIGHT BY SLEEPING UNDER NETS OR USING REPPELLENTS.
you need your yellow fever and anti malaria
You do not need any particular vaccines to come to Ghana. The only health concern is malaria, but for even that you may be fully protected from mosquitos by the hotel where you might be staying.
yes, you will need vacinations before coming to Ghana, you have to go for a yellow fever vacination, health hazards? well, Ghana has a good atmosphere for tourist but you may need to be educated about malaria and diarrhea if this is your first time. If you are planning on visiting Ghana, then i tell you, you will not regret it when you do.
vaccinations against yellow fiver anti malaria drugs are very important. In addition carry on some antibiotics in case the need arises
Hey, truth is you really don't NEED any vaccinations before coming to Ghana. We don't have a high and threatening prevalence of endemic viral and bacterial infections!!

That said, however, for your health safetly while here, it's important that you bring along prophylaxis for Malaria, which is the most important infection for which your body does not have antibodies for. Mosquitoes here are vectors of the tropical P. falciparum, which is not a very friendly parasite. Most of anti-malarial medications I have seen used by my tourists are of the "quinone" family of drugs, and they seem to work perfectly fine for them.

You can also buy bottled water from here when you arrive to reduce the likeliness of suffering traveler's diarrhoea, a coming infection suffered by many tourists.
This comment is an addition to my submission. If you require any vaccination, the Ghana High Commission will do well to notify you of any such thing. If they do not, then there's no need to fear, I assure you.

The silliest thing I remember asking my host when I was travelling to Chicago was "Should I be scared of getting avian influenza when I come visit...you know everyone's sneezing without covering their mouths..." You know what they did? They've been laughing at me ever since, and anytime they remember me asking them that question.

In short, you have nothing to fear. Plus, I teach medical students. You'll be in safe hands when you arrive, trust me.

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