Question

what are some facts or history about the Trevi Fountain

and also some of the other famous fountains

Location

Country: Italy

Answers

The Fontana di Trevi or Trevi Fountain is the most famous and arguably the most beautiful fountain in all of Rome. This impressive monument dominates the small Trevi square located in the Quirinale district.

Aqua Virgo
The Trevi fountain is at the ending part of the Aqua Virgo, an aqueduct constructed in 19 BC. It brings water all the way from the Salone Springs (approx 20km from Rome) and supplies the fountains in the historic center of Rome with water.


Construction of the Fountain
In 1732, Pope Clement XII commissioned Nicola Salvi to create a large fountain at the Trevi Square. A previous undertaking to build the fountain after a design by Bernini was halted a century earlier after the death of Pope Urban VIII. Salvi based his theatrical masterpiece on this design. Construction of the monumental baroque fountain was finally completed in 1762.


The Fountain
The central figure of the fountain, in front of a large niche, is Neptune, god of the sea. He is riding a chariot in the shape of a shell, pulled by two sea horses. Each sea horse is guided by a Triton. One of the horses is calm and obedient, the other one restive. They symbolize the fluctuating moods of the sea.
On the left hand side of Neptune is a statue representing Abundance, the statue on the right represents Salubrity. Above the sculptures are bas-reliefs, one of them shows Agrippa, the girl after whom the aqueduct was named.


Tossing a Coin
The water at the bottom of the fountain represents the sea. Legend has it you will return to Rome if you throw a coin into the water. You should toss it over your shoulder with your back to the fountain
Check out the movies and clips about this fountain, before you come to Rome;

Film
A scene in the 1953 comedy Roman Holiday with Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, and Eddie Albert.
Three Coins in the Fountain. (1954)
A scene of drenching Anita Ekberg in Federico Fellini's La dolce vita.
A fictionalized filming of this scene in C'eravamo tanto amati.
Coins in the Fountain a 1990 remake of the 1954 film starring Loni Anderson.
Several scenes in The Lizzie McGuire Movie.
Several scenes in Sabrina Goes to Rome.
A few scenes in the Chinese series Triumph in the Skies
A scene in the 'Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen' Movie When in Rome.
A scene in the 2005 film Elsa y Fred where the same scene in La Dolce Vita is remade because of the title character's lifelong wish.
Bon Jovi's Thank You For Loving Me music video was filmed there.
Rosie, in Rome there are 280 wonderful fountains and each fountain has its history and legend.
Rome's most spectacular fountain is the Trevi Fountain. The legend holds that you will return to Rome if you throw a coin into the water but...you should toss it over your shoulder with your back to the fountain! As you can imagine a lot of coins are thrown into the fountain each day. They are collected at night to subsidize a social centre for Rome's needy.
Among the 280 beautiful Rome fountains you should not miss the Turtle Fountain in the Jewish Ghetto and the Baroque masterpieces created by Bernini: The Barcaccia at the base of the Spanish Steps (Bernini’s first fountain), the Fountain of Triton and the Fountain of the four Rivers located in the magnificent Navona Square.
With its impressive concentration of fountains you should also NOT miss the marvellous Villa D’Este in Tivoli (fifteen miles on the east of Rome)
The Trevi Fountain (Italian: Fontana di Trevi) is a fountain in the Trevi rione in Rome, Italy. Standing at 25.9 meters (85 feet) high and 19.8 meters (65 feet) wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city.
Pre-1629 history of the aqueduct and the fountain site
Trevi Fountain at night.

The fountain at the junction of three roads (tre vie)[1] marks the terminal point[2] of the "modern" Acqua Vergine, the revivified Aqua Virgo, one of the ancient aqueducts that supplied water to ancient Rome. In 19 BC, supposedly with the help of a virgin, Roman technicians located a source of pure water some 13 km (8 miles) from the city. (This scene is presented on the present fountain's façade.) However, the eventual indirect route of the aqueduct made its length some 22 km (14 miles). This Aqua Virgo led the water into the Baths of Agrippa. It served Rome for more than four hundred years. The coup de grâce for the urban life of late classical Rome came when the Goth besiegers in 537/38 broke the aqueducts. Medieval Romans were reduced to drawing water from polluted wells and the Tiber River, which was also used as a sewer.
The Roman custom of building a handsome fountain at the endpoint of an aqueduct that brought water to Rome was revived in the 15th century, with the Renaissance. In 1453, Pope Nicholas V finished mending the Acqua Vergine aqueduct and built a simple basin, designed by the humanist architect Leon Battista Alberti, to herald the water's arrival.
Commission, construction and design
In 1629 Pope Urban VIII, finding the earlier fountain insufficiently dramatic, asked Bernini to sketch possible renovations, but when the Pope died, the project was abandoned. Bernini's lasting contribution was to resite the fountain from the other side of the square to face the Quirinal Palace (so the Pope could look down and enjoy it). Though Bernini's project was torn down for Salvi's fountain, there are many Bernini touches in the fountain as it was built. An early, striking and influential model by Pietro da Cortona, preserved in the Albertina, Vienna, also exists, as do various early 18th century sketches, most unsigned, as well as a project attributed to Nicola Michetti one attributed to Ferdinando Fuga and a French design by Edme Bouchardon.
Panorama of the Trevi Fountain.
Competitions had become the rage during the Baroque era to design buildings, fountains, and even the Spanish Steps. In 1730 Pope Clement XII organized a contest in which Nicola Salvi initially lost to Alessandro Galilei — but due to the outcry in Rome over the fact that a Florentine won, Salvi was awarded the commission anyway.[8] Work began in 1732, and the fountain was completed in 1762, long after Clement's death, when Pietro Bracci's Oceanus (god of all water) was set in the central niche.
The asso di coppe
Salvi died in 1751, with his work half-finished, but before he went he made sure a stubborn barber's unsightly sign would not spoil the ensemble, hiding it behind a sculpted vase, called by Romans the asso di coppe, "the "Ace of Cups".

The Trevi Fountain was finished in 1762 by Giuseppe Pannini, who substituted the present allegories for planned sculptures of Agrippa and "Trivia", the Roman virgin.
Restoration
The fountain was refurbished in 1998; the stonework was scrubbed and the fountain provided with recirculating pumps.
The fountain filled with coins, from another perspective.
Iconography
The backdrop for the fountain is the Palazzo Poli, given a new facade with a giant order of Corinthian pilasters that link the two main stories. Taming of the waters is the theme of the gigantic scheme that tumbles forward, mixing water and rockwork, and filling the small square. Tritons guide Oceanus' shell chariot, taming seahorses (hippocamps).

In the center is superimposed a robustly modelled triumphal arch. The center niche or exedra framing Oceanus has free-standing columns for maximal light-and-shade. In the niches flanking Oceanus, Abundance spills water from her urn and Salubrity holds a cup from which a snake drinks. Above, bas reliefs illustrate the Roman origin of the aqueducts.

The tritons and horses provide symmetrical balance, with the maximum contrast in their mood and poses (by 1730, rococo was already in full bloom in France and Germany).
Fontana di Trevi by night.

Coin throwing

A traditional legend holds that if visitors throw a coin into the fountain, they are ensured a return to Rome. Among those who are unaware that the "three coins" of Three Coins in the Fountain were thrown by three different individuals, a reported current interpretation is that two coins will lead to a new romance and three will ensure either a marriage or divorce. A reported current version of this legend is that it is lucky to throw three coins with one's right hand over one's left shoulder into the Trevi Fountain.
Biult between 1732 and 1762 this fountain was signed by Nicola Salvi, although based on a projetct conceived by Gian Lorenzo Bernini the previous century. Dedicated to Poseidon, the foutain celebrates all mythological figures related to the water and the ocean. Used as set-location in many movies shot in Rome, the most famous was probalbly "Roman Holidays", the movie which started the tradition of the "three coins in the fountain". The water still comes today from the famous aqueduct built by Marcus Agrippa in the first century B.C.

You can find some photos of other famous roman fountains at this address:
Two summers ago a political group put red dye in the Trevi and for about an hour it looked blood stained. The same group poured thousands of plastic balls down the Spanish Steps.
Trevi fountain like many other springs within the historical centre of Rome (the ones of Piazza Navona, Piazza di Spagna and a lot more) are provided of their water by the "acquedotto della Vergine" (aqueduct of Virgin), the only ancient roman aqueduct still working.
another fountain you should not miss is the fountain of the four rivers, mentioned even by Dan Brown in his best seller "Angels & Demons". This masterpiece fountain of the Baroque was made by Bernini for the Pamphili pope Innocent X in 1651, reusing an obelisk of the Domitian time. The square also displays other two nice fountains made by Giacomo della Porta in the late 1500.
The main fact is that has no reason to exist but its beauty. Its a waste of Marble, Craftsmanship, Art, Water, Room for the sole pleasure of the eyes and the mind. This is why is so famous, and many other thousands of little and big fountains (thre are about 3.000 in the urban area) make Rome unique also under this spot.

Was made both to celebrate the Acqueduct and the Popes, now enchants tourists and Romans, but is best to see it at night or better soon before dawn, when Rome is pure magic, and in the silence things that no guide or handbook could tell became clear to you.

Best Mario
The Trevi Fountain is the biggest and most famous fountain of Rome. It is 26 meters tall and 22 meters wide.

The fountain was named Trevi because three streets (”tre vie”) used to lead to the Piazza di Trevi.
The Trevi Fountain is a mixture of Baroque and Classicism sculpture and can be found on the façade of the Palazzo Poli.
General Agrippa had the Trevi Fontein built in 19 b.C. when he wanted to restore the old aqueduct, the Aqua Virgo, in order to lead water to the Pantheon.
That early fountain was moved several times and more sculptures were added to it until Pope Urban VIII ordered Bernini to make a project.
Because of lack of finances Bernini’s project was not completed however until, in 1731, Pope Clement XII took the Trevi Fountain’s destiny into his own hands. A year later work on the fountain was resumed. The project was by the architect Nicolo Salvi, who had won a competition. It was Salvi’s aim to tell the history of the aqueduct and the fountain itself through its design.
Until 1762 various other architects added parts to the fountain and it became a symbol of Papal Rome.

In Rome there are many others fountains; i'm an umbrian guide and i suggest to visit one of the most attractive feature of Perugia's Piazza Grande: the Major Fountain, very beautiful for the elegance of its lines, the harmony of its form and its precious decorations.
It was built in 1278 perhaps according to plans by Brother Bevignate, who designed two poligonal and concentric marble basins surmounted by a bronze bowl. This fountain is one of the most beautiful because of the elegance of its lines, the harmony of its form and the value of its decorations consisting of 50 bas-reliefs and 24 statues by Nicola and Giovanni Pisano. The panels of the basins represent various personages, saints, symbols and scenes referring to the city's history, and to middle ages imagination. The fountain has recently undergone restoration, which has given it its former splendour.
And many others fountains in Umbria...
In 1629 Pope Urban VIII, finding the earlier fountain insufficiently dramatic, asked Bernini to sketch possible renovations, but when the Pope died, the project was abandoned. Bernini's lasting contribution was to resite the fountain from the other side of the square to face the Quirinal Palace (so the Pope could look down and enjoy it). Though Bernini's project was torn down for Salvi's fountain, there are many Bernini touches in the fountain as it was built. An early, striking and influential model by Pietro da Cortona, preserved in the Albertina, Vienna, also exists, as do various early 18th century sketches, most unsigned, as well as a project attributed to Nicola Michetti[5] one attributed to Ferdinando Fuga[6] and a French design by Edme Bouchardon.[7]

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